Providing Osteopathic Care for the whole family...

Your First Visit

Osteopathy is now recognised as Primary Care and as such you do not need to have a referral in order to attend our clinic.

Osteopaths assess and treat people of any ages from the newborn to the elderly.

On your first visit, you will be asked to complete a consultation form, after which your practitioner will ask you about the condition for which you are seeking attention and also about your general health. He will make a full medical assessment. He will take time to listen to you and ask questions to make sure he understands your medical history and your day-to-day routine. He may ask you about things like diet, exercise and what is happening in your life, as these may give clues to help our diagnosis.

It is helpful if you can bring a list of all medications you may be currently taking and the results of any medical tests or scans.

Following the consultation, you will be examined to identify the problem and to establish whether it is appropriate to be treated Osteopathically.

Your posture

Osteopathic evaluation will usually involve looking at your posture and how you move your body. We may also assess what happens when certain joints are moved and see what hurts, where and when.

Trouble areas

Using touch, known as palpation, we may also find the areas which are sensitive or tight and this helps us to identify what’s going on. When we have done this, we can diagnose your condition.

As part of the examination we may feel your pulse and check your reflexes and may also take your blood pressure and refer you for clinical tests, such as x-rays, if we think you need them.

Sometimes, if it is felt that osteopathy is not appropriate for you then advice will be given and you may be refered to your GP or another specialist such as an orthopaedic surgeon, as deemed fit.

Prior to treatment, patients will be given an explanation of their problem, the recommended approach to treatment and expected outcome, any potential risks or side effects from treatment and an indication of the proposed treatment plan and estimated cost.

Your treatment

Patients usually receive treatment at the same session, prior to which, will be given an explanation of their problem, the recommended approach to treatment and expected outcome, any potential risks or side effects from treatment and an indication of the proposed treatment plan and estimated cost

During the course of the examination and treatment, patients will very likely be asked to either undress down to underwear or are advised to wear loose fitting clothing, such that will allow for the examination of the particular area of concern. Your practitioner will leave the room while you dress or undress.

If a patient wishes, they are welcome to bring along a friend or relative to sit in during the session to act as chaperone. Children under the age of 16 are expected to be accompanied by an adult.

Osteopaths use a wide range of gentle manipulations, depending on your age, fitness and diagnosis. Treatment is different for every patient but may include techniques such as different types of soft tissue massage and joint articulation to release tension, stretch muscles, help relieve pain and mobilise your joints.

Sometimes, when we move joints you may hear a ‘click’. This is just like the click people get when they crack their knuckles and is nothing to be worried about.

At the end of the treatment session, you will be goven an explanation of your problem and other affecting issues and an indication of further treatments required and tips on self-help may be given.

Patients are advised to inform their GP that they have undertaken Osteopathic treatment.

In acute pain?

If you are in acute pain then click here to find out what you can to to help yourself whilst waiting for your appointment.

A recent high quality study has demonstrated that paracetamol is no better than a placebo in treating acute episodes of low back pain.
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